Make Do And Mend

Sherborne Museum

About The Project

Project Launch

Our Project - What It Has Meant To Us


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Patchwork Quilt

Patchwork Day

Rationing

Our Treasures

Sherborne Bombing Interviews

Sherborne Red Warnings

Private Carter Memoirs


Ilminster Memories

Wartime Morning

Wartime Sing-Song

Memories Afternoon

St Johns' Almshouse

Sherborne Museum Treasures Day

Leigh Old Vicarage Memories Morning

Sherborne Bombing 70 Years On


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Supported through
'Their Past Your Future 2' (TPYF2) Programme

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When?

All | 1937 | 1938 | 1939 | 1940 | 1941 | 1942 | 1943 | 1944 | 1945 | 1946 | 1947 | 1948 | 1949 | 1950


Food and Cooking
In The Home
Scotland
Wales
Northern Ireland
North West
North East
Midlands
South West
South East
1939 - 1945

"Every household became a miniature munitions dump during Christmas - and the munitions are wanted now for active service. Your munitions comprise all those Christmas cards, letters, boxes, gift wrappings, decorations and crackers. Paper is a munition of war. Every household must see that its accumulation of Christmas paper gets to the enemy in the most effective form. In one envelope there is sufficient paper to make a wad for a bullet. Remember that 3lbs of waste paper makes containers for two anti-aircraft shells. A ton of paper will make, among other things, 9000 shell fuse components. You probably had your weekly joint of meat on Christmas Day. Don't forget that the bone is wanted too. Bones provide glycerine for high explosives as well as glue for binding particular aircraft parts, body filling for camouflage paints, fertiliser for growing food, and feeding meals for cattle and poultry. Scrap metal is also vitally important. Five tons of ferrous metal will provide steel for 8145 anti-aircraft shells."
UK

Wartime Christmas
A newspaper cutting of January 1942 has been sent to us.

Do you remember having to make do and mend? Please submit your experiences.