Make Do And Mend

Sherborne Museum

About The Project

Project Launch

Our Project - What It Has Meant To Us


Search Clothing

Search Food and Cooking

Search Everyday Life

Search In The Home


Patchwork Quilt

Patchwork Day

Rationing

Our Treasures

Sherborne Bombing Interviews

Sherborne Red Warnings

Private Carter Memoirs


Ilminster Memories

Wartime Morning

Wartime Sing-Song

Memories Afternoon

St Johns' Almshouse

Sherborne Museum Treasures Day

Leigh Old Vicarage Memories Morning

Sherborne Bombing 70 Years On


Submit Your Experiences

Contact Us


Big Lottery Fund
MLA

Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional

Text Size:
+   -   Reset

Supported through
'Their Past Your Future 2' (TPYF2) Programme

Search

When?

All | 1937 | 1938 | 1939 | 1940 | 1941 | 1942 | 1943 | 1944 | 1945 | 1946 | 1947 | 1948 | 1949 | 1950

Previous Page | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Next Page

Everyday Life
South West
1939 - 1945
Recollections of an evacuee family that arrived at Yetminster on their own.
"We had a lot of evacuees in the village that arrived from a London school but we also had some that came on their own. Many were billeted with families in the village but others occupied empty cottages when they arrived as a family. I remember Mrs Bone and her four children Barbara, Peter, Rita and David came from London. We never heard or saw Mr Bone. They lived at the bottom of Mill Lane – at Crossing Cottage – a Victorian red brick house that belonged to the railway and was empty at the time. The children went to our village school and one of the girls was my age. Most of the evacuees returned to London before the war ended but the Bone family stayed until the end of the war. Crossing Cottage was a nice house compared to others in the village and very well built. It is sad that the railway is thinking of demolishing it in 2011."
Yetminster, Dorset

Heather Helliar (right) pictured at Thornford shortly before the Second World War with her sister Sylvia (left) and Aunt Lily Heather Helliar
Heather Helliar moved to Yetminster while still at primary school, shortly after war broke out. Her grandparents still lived at Thornford and she recalls.
Food and Cooking
South West
1939 - 1945

"We bred large rabbits - Flemmish Giants and Belgian Hares". When they were large enough Unc. would kill them on a Wednesday evening and I would carry them on the Thursday bus to Sherborne to sell the surplus ones at Parsons the Butchers in Cheap Street."
Thornford, Dorset

Lily Garrett
Lily Garrett her Aunt who died in 1971 had often spoken of keeping rabbits during the war as meat was rationed.
Clothing
South West
1939 - 1945

"I would unpick old clothes and make them into outfits for Heather and Sylvia. Sometimes I would re-make my clothes into something more fashionable. It was alright when fashions got shorter but there was nothing we could do when longer lengths came in!"
Thornford, Dorset

Lily Garrett
Lily Garrett her Aunt who died in 1971 had often spoken of keeping rabbits during the war as meat was rationed.
Food and Cooking
Everyday Life
South West
South East
1939 - 1945
IVY MITCHELL nee PULLMAN RECALLED 17th Jan 2009
"I was born at Templecombe but was working in Sherborne at the start of the war. If I had stayed working at the boys and girls school I probably would not have been called up but I went to work at Milborne Port Glove Factory and that was when I was called up. I was sent to work in Reading for four years. First I had to fill shells, not the very big ones, and then later on I was trained to test them - that was dangerous. You had flames coming out of the machine around your legs. I was in lodgings and had a day off a fortnight. I couldn’t afford to go home more than once a month. My Uncle who was a Police Inspector at Bognor Regis used to pay for me to go to stay with him once a month.
I used to travel from Templecombe by train and changed at Basingstoke. I was in lodgings. I had three days off one Christmas and was going to travel back with my friend. We knew the train would be packed so we gathered a bunch of prickly holly. We soon cleared a space.
I was quite popular because I didn’t take sugar so my sugar ration was shared with the others. There was hardly any cake. Sometimes we managed to get some Huntley and Palmers cake - but that was under the carpet! It was lovely.
If we had relations working in food factories they used to share the extras their employers gave them. We swapped with something we could send them. Father used to shoot rabbits and we sent them up to Bristol relations. They used to send back cheese from the factory they worked in.
My friend’s brother was in the army. He sent a wooden box of fruit to me from France. We couldn’t get any. When it arrived the fruit had been stolen and all I got was the empty box!"
Reading

Ivy Mitchell nee Pullman Ivy Mitchell
Ivy Mitchell nee Pullman born at Templecombe (90 in November 2008) and sent to work in Reading filling shells.
Food and Cooking
In The Home
South East
1939 - 1945

"Mum and I were living in Earls Court, Kensington. My Dad was serving abroad. I remember being taken out to see the light in the city from the blitz. We could read a newspaper at night in the street it was so bright. Then we got bombed out. Mum and I went to live with my aunt and uncle at Brookwood.[ near Woking, Surrey ] Uncle Bob was serving in the RAF and based in Ireland. Every time he came home he would bring some fresh hens eggs. Aunty used to keep them in a crock in the cellar for safety."
Earls Court, Kensington

Jane Weymer
Jane is now living in Stalbridge, Dorset
Food and Cooking
Everyday Life
South West
1939 - 1945

"We were lucky living on the farm. Grandad kept the vegetable garden going and we weren't really short of anything. I made butter. I didn't make cheese until after the war. I won a scholarship to Agricultural College and learnt it there."
Dorset

Connie Read
Connie Read of Leigh recalled...
Food and Cooking
South West
1939 - 1945

"Mum used to send me down to the river to search for moorhen nests. There were so many in those days - not coots just moorhens. Then she would tie a spoon on to a long stick. I had to reach over and lift out and egg and put it in the water. If it floated it wasn't any good. If it sank then I was to remove two or three from the full clutch of as many as 14 and bring them home. Moorhen eggs tasted lovely - quite unlike any other eggs. Eggs were rationed you see."
Bembury Farm, Thornford, Dorset

Dennis Mitchell
Dennis's parents living at Bembury Farm where they were fortunate to have four or five cows and were not short of milk
Food and Cooking
South West
1939 - 1945

"We had a duck that always made its nest high up in one of the trees by the river. When she left the nest I had to check how many eggs she had. If she had lots I had to remove two or three then we had duck eggs for tea. We never took them all - just a few!"
Bembury Farm, Thornford, Dorset

Dennis Mitchell
Dennis's parents living at Bembury Farm where they were fortunate to have four or five cows and were not short of milk
In The Home
Everyday Life
South West
1939 - 1945
Dennis Mitchell was called up for War Ag. work.
"I was working for Dukes at Martinstown, near Dorchester, Dorset. I didn't live in with the family but in the old tack rooms next to the stable. We had to plough up a lot of grassland and I had had to go back to the farm for something. It was a good job I did because when I got back up to the far side of the ridge it was peppered with craters where some German planes had been turned back and had dropped their bombs. We weren't far from the coast so they often dropped their bombs before they got to the Channel.
We used to get lots of incendiaries dropped on Martinstown. There was a lot of army activity there. We were always meeting them on the road but there were also a lot of thatched houses that would have burnt well if they had been hit.
I remember Dukes kept a lot of sheep. The shepherd used to turn them out by day and get them in and fold them over a lot of crops at night - sometimes it was turnips, sometimes mustard or other root crops. When the shepherd was away old Walt had to see to the sheep. I was ploughing across a field and saw him take the sheep across to the gateway. I could see something sticking up out of the ground. The sheep were all jumping over it. Walt didn't take any notice but later on I went over to see what it was. There were fins sticking out of the ground. I thought it was a bomb! I went to tell Mr Duke and he came back up with me to have a look at it. We sent for the army and they had to detonate it. Walt said it had been there for several days but he hadn't taken any notice of it. He had been walking across by it to open the gate and had said the sheep jumped over it so he didn't worry!"
Dorchester, Dorset

Dennis Mitchell
Dennis's parents living at Bembury Farm where they were fortunate to have four or five cows and were not short of milk
Food and Cooking
South West
1939 - 1945

"Our small Dorset farm had a little orchard. We boys had to go out and pick up all of the fallen apples each day after school. We didn’t go short of food during the war. Every night we had a pudding and from September through to April, depending how well they kept, we had apples every night. Mum would bake them, make apple turnovers, boiled apple dumplings and apple turnovers. It was always apple but she said they were good for us and we were usually healthy."
Dorset

Dennis Mitchell
Dennis's parents living at Bembury Farm where they were fortunate to have four or five cows and were not short of milk

Do you remember having to make do and mend? Please submit your experiences.