Make Do And Mend

Sherborne Museum

About The Project

Project Launch

Our Project - What It Has Meant To Us


Search Clothing

Search Food and Cooking

Search Everyday Life

Search In The Home


Patchwork Quilt

Patchwork Day

Rationing

Our Treasures

Sherborne Bombing Interviews

Sherborne Red Warnings

Private Carter Memoirs


Ilminster Memories

Wartime Morning

Wartime Sing-Song

Memories Afternoon

St Johns' Almshouse

Sherborne Museum Treasures Day

Leigh Old Vicarage Memories Morning

Sherborne Bombing 70 Years On


Submit Your Experiences

Contact Us


Big Lottery Fund
MLA

Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional

Text Size:
+   -   Reset

Supported through
'Their Past Your Future 2' (TPYF2) Programme

Search

When?

All | 1937 | 1938 | 1939 | 1940 | 1941 | 1942 | 1943 | 1944 | 1945 | 1946 | 1947 | 1948 | 1949 | 1950

Previous Page | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Next Page

Food and Cooking
Everyday Life
South West
1939 - 1945

"I remember seeing French soldiers sat all along the prom in their dusty uniforms and tin hats. They had been rescued from France and were writing postcards. They kept asking us to post them to France so that their relations would know they were safe. They didn't have any money. Some men gave them cigarettes and the volunteers came to give them drinks and soup."
Weymouth, Dorset

Lily Stansford
was sent to stay with relations at Weymouth.
Everyday Life
South West
1939 - 1945

"Mum used to speak about the bombing of Templecombe. They were aiming for the railway line but missed. The bombs hit a row of houses. It was evening so all of the men survived as they were at the pub but all of their wives were killed as they were at home."
Templecombe, Somerset

Lily Pullman
was away working in a munitions factory but her mother was still living at Templecombe, Somerset.
In The Home
Everyday Life
South West
1939 - 1945
Dennis Mitchell was called up for War Ag. work.
"I was working for Dukes at Martinstown, near Dorchester, Dorset. I didn't live in with the family but in the old tack rooms next to the stable. We had to plough up a lot of grassland and I had had to go back to the farm for something. It was a good job I did because when I got back up to the far side of the ridge it was peppered with craters where some German planes had been turned back and had dropped their bombs. We weren't far from the coast so they often dropped their bombs before they got to the Channel.
We used to get lots of incendiaries dropped on Martinstown. There was a lot of army activity there. We were always meeting them on the road but there were also a lot of thatched houses that would have burnt well if they had been hit.
I remember Dukes kept a lot of sheep. The shepherd used to turn them out by day and get them in and fold them over a lot of crops at night - sometimes it was turnips, sometimes mustard or other root crops. When the shepherd was away old Walt had to see to the sheep. I was ploughing across a field and saw him take the sheep across to the gateway. I could see something sticking up out of the ground. The sheep were all jumping over it. Walt didn't take any notice but later on I went over to see what it was. There were fins sticking out of the ground. I thought it was a bomb! I went to tell Mr Duke and he came back up with me to have a look at it. We sent for the army and they had to detonate it. Walt said it had been there for several days but he hadn't taken any notice of it. He had been walking across by it to open the gate and had said the sheep jumped over it so he didn't worry!"
Dorchester, Dorset

Dennis Mitchell
Dennis's parents living at Bembury Farm where they were fortunate to have four or five cows and were not short of milk
Food and Cooking
Everyday Life
South East
1939 - 1945

"I was born at Finsbury Park, London. My parents changed their name back to mother's name of Hunt when they thought there was going to be another war. My father was Zeb Reinthler, an Austrian Pastry Cook who was in demand at London Hotels, but when the First World War broke out he was detained in the Alexandra Palace. Mother was only allowed to visit him once a week and he spent his time making intricate wooden toys for me and his neices and nephews. He was no threat and certainly not a spy and his detention affected him for the rest of his life. Fearing he would be arrested again Mother suggested we change our name to Hunt. However we were bombed out of our home in Finsbury Park which they had bought. Despite the bombing raids they would not go to Dorset where Aunt Clara would have made them very welcome. Aunt Clara used to send us boxes of apples and eggs by train as they had a lot more food than we did."
London

Joseph Hunt

Everyday Life
South West
1939 - 1945

"The story of Annie Baker of Bristol, who married Bertram Brown an employee of the Bristol Aeroplane Company, has been passed to the Curator for inclusion in 'Make do and Mend'. Mrs Brown became well known across Bristol for her kindness to children who had suffered loss during the war or been bombed out of their homes. She made at least 3000 rag dolls in different styles and had each blessed by a Rector before delivering them. She continued to make dolls after the war and was awarded the OBE for her charity work. All across the country similar schemes, but usually on a much smaller scale, took place whether making knitted blankets for those bombed in the East End or items for Red Cross sale."
Bristol

Annie Brown

Everyday Life
South West
1939 - 1945

"My Dad came home one night saying there was something going on at Monkton Farleigh quarry. We lived just outside of Bradford on Avon and we heard the old stone quarry had become a huge underground ammunition store. It was busy on the lead up to D Day. Some time later about 1942 time I think, Bath was bombed badly. We could see the flames. They said 500 people had been killed on two nights of bombing and hundreds of houses had to be demolished.

Lots more people have recalled special stores and ammunition caches in farm buildings, isolated barns and special factories across the West Country."
Bradford on Avon, Somerset

Arthur Smith

Food and Cooking
Everyday Life
South West
1939 - 1945

"I was eight when war broke out. I lived at Thornford near Sherborne in Dorset. My parents lived at Cross House and Dad was a builder. I remember most of all the troops who were stationed in the village - all the different regiments and the Americans - some set up camp in Kings Road and their cookhouse was on our land at Cross House. They were all very nice. They used to tease me because I had such rosy cheeks. They used to ask if I had put rouge on them! They used to give us sweets. I remember the build up to D Day and then they were gone. It was strange without them.
On Monday 30th September 1940 in the afternoon I was walking up to Thornford Hill with my Mum, Gran and Great Gran. Great Gran had been evacuated from Worcester Park. She didn't live with us but she used to come to us for meals. We were going blackberrying. Dad was working nights and was in bed. We heard this noise and then there was a grey mist. We thought Thornford had been bombed. The noise was awful. We were worried about Dad. We rushed back to the village as fast as we could and found it wasn't Thornford but Sherborne town that had been hit - three miles away. When I left Thornford school at 11 I went to Lord Digby's School for Girls - the grammar school in Sherborne. One day I was on Yeovil Pen Mill Station with friends and I saw an American Captain looking at me. Then he rushed over and threw his arms around me . "You look just like my little girl back home" he said. He kept in touch after that and one day arrived at the school to look for me! Miss Thomson wasn't very pleased, the Headmistress, and called me into her office. I explained and it was alright and he was allowed to see me. Then one day he wrote to me. He used to write - and said I won't write for a while. I have to go away. I didn't hear from him again. He used to send me parcels of food and things. I have always wondered what happened. Did he get killed and his little girl never saw him again? He was really nice."
Thornford, Dorset

Barbara Edwards
nee Burrett
In The Home
Everyday Life
South West
1939 - 1945

"We lived at Lake. It was a good half a mile out of Thornford Village. Our postal address was Thornford Road. The children had to walk into the village to go to school. The evacuees had arrived in the village and our neighbour Mrs Garrett had two - a boy and a girl. The little girl was about three or four and her brother was a bit older. They had all come down from a Roman Catholic School in the east end of London. I remember one day I had crossed the road. It was never very busy. I was in the fields on the other side of the road with some friends. The others were playing in the garden with a ball. Suddenly the ball came over the hedge out into the road. I saw Cecil starting to run and shouted to him not to come out into the road as I could hear a motorbike coming. He either didn't hear or just kept on coming anyway. The bike hit him and skidded a long way and took him right down the road to where our well was. We didn't have any mains water. It was a Despatch Rider. He wasn't hurt but he could see the little boy was. He picked him up and carried him back up the road to the cottages. He had to go as he had an urgent message to deliver. Someone sent for the ambulance - we didn't have the phone - and he was taken to the Yeatman Hospital. Later we heard he had died. His mother came down from London for the funeral and took the little girl - I think her name was Rita - back to London with her."
Thornford, Dorset

Kathleen Gray

Clothing
South West
1939 - 1945

"Make do and Mend! I remember it well. I used to turn sheets sides to the middle and make new collars for father's shirts out of shirt tails. Then when the cuffs wore out I used to shorten the sleeves to make short sleeved shirts. We didn't waste anything or throw things away."
Dorset

Kathleen Gray

Everyday Life
South West
1939 - 1945

"Best of all I remember all the Regimental dances we used to go to. We had a lot of different regiments billeted at Thornford [near Sherborne, Dorset]. Every Saturday evening each Regiment used to organise a dance in the village hall and I used to go with my friends. We used to love them."
Thornford, Dorset

Kathleen Gray

Do you remember having to make do and mend? Please submit your experiences.